Tridoshic Recipes

RECIPES THAT SUIT ALL DOSHAS

 (TRIDOSHIC RECIPES)

Breakfast – eat like a saint

Lunch – eat like a king

Dinner – eat like a pauper

 

Overview of the Ayurvedic Diet

Our constitution or Prakruti* is what you are born with and it only becomes a problem when aggravated. Others doshas may dominate according to lifestyle habits and we call this our Vikruti*. It too can be a problem if it gets too far out of balance.

Ayurveda says that your Prakruti determines what you can digest. If you take in things that you can’t digest, they become toxins to the body and create imbalances in the doshas*. Imbalances in doshas result in both physical and mental disorders.

Ayurveda aims to reduce or avoid foods that cannot be digested and to aid the digestion of helpful foods to ensure their maximum benefit. Some foods or cooking methods recommended by Ayurveda seem counter-intuitive to the Western idea of nutrition which relies on a broad range of foods to ensure adequate nutrition. Ayurveda focuses on foods that are easy to digest according to your Prakruti and cooking methods that aid digestion so that nutrients can be absorbed readily.

In the West we often use vitamin and mineral supplements because our body cannot absorb sufficient nutrients from our regular diet. According to Ayurveda, this is probably because we cannot digest the foods containing these nutrients. Ayurveda says that if our digestion is working well we will absorb all of the nutrients we need from compatible foods – even though cooking may reduce some nutrients. As the golden rule of real estate is position, position, position, the golden rule of Ayurveda is digestion, digestion, digestion.

 * Prakruti – primal nature; also our biological constitution at birth

* Vikruti – current imbalance or disease state

* Dosha – one of the three basic types of biological energy, which determine individual constitution: Vata, Pitta and Kapha. It can also mean the excess of one of these in nature.


 Ayurvedic tastes of Food

 Ayurveda says tastes either raise of lower a dosha

 é raises the dosha ê lowers the dosha

Sweetcooling  Sugar, honey, molasses, milk, certain grains (rice, barley, wheat, buckwheat, cornmeal, millet, rye) sweet fruits (apples, berries, pears, grapes, sweet melons, figs) sweet vegetables (corn, carrots, onions, sweet potatoes) licorice root, red clove, peppermint, slippery elm Vata   êPitta   êKapha é
Saltyheating  salt, meat, soy sauce, miso, kelp Vata   êPitta   éKapha é
Sour heating lemons, limes, cheese, yoghurt, vinegar, some fruits are both sweet and sour strawberries, cantaloupe, grapes, oranges, pineapple, papaya, rhubarb tomatoes green grapes, lemon, hibiscus, rose hips, tamarind Vata   êPitta   éKapha é
Pungentheating  Cayenne pepper, chilli peppers, onions, garlic, ginger, bell peppers, carrots, radish, asafoetida, Vata   éPitta   éKapha ê
Bittercooling  Greens, (collard, kale) endive, romaine lettuce, spinach, turmeric, dandelion root, holy thistle, osha, yellow dock, rhubarb. fresh turmeric root, fenugreek, gentian root Vata     éPitta   êKapha ê
Astringent  Beans, lentils, adzuki beans, black beans, chickpeas, mung dhal, pinto beans, soy beans, navy beans, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, celery, green beans, artichoke, lettuce, potatoes, spinach, squash, carrots, corn, unripe banana, pomegranate, myrrh, golden seal, turmeric, alum Vata   éPitta   êKapha ê

 Nutrition from an Ayurvedic perspective – the ancients offered principles about a healthy diet and how it is to be eaten. They are:

Food needs to be hot (usually cooked)

Food needs to be tasty and easy to digest

Food needs to be eaten in the proper amounts, not too much or too little

Food needs to be eaten on an empty stomach, after your last mean has been digested, not before

Foods need to work together and not contradict one another in their actions

Foods need to be eaten in pleasant surroundings with the proper equipment for their enjoyment

Eating should not be rushed or a long drawn out affair

It is best to focus on your food while eating

Only eat food which is nourishing to your particular constitution which suits your mental and emotional temperament

 

TRIDOSHIC VEGETABLE CURRY                                                serves 9 -10

Preparation time : 1 hour

-Vata – Pitta – Kapha

 

1 cup of fresh green peas (frozen can be used if necessary)

1 cup or carrots, diced

1 cup of potatoes, diced

2 cups of green string beans or asparagus, cut in 1 inch pieces

2 tbsp sunflower oil or ghee

2 tsp cumin seeds

2 tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp sea salt

1 ½ cups water

2 tsp turmeric

1 tsp coriander powder

½ cup of yoghurt

 

Heat oil or ghee in large heavy skillet. Add mustard and cumin sees, when the mustard seeds pop, add turmeric. Then add all the vegetables and the water. (If using frozen peas, do not add until rest of vegetables are nearly done.) Cook covered until the vegetables become tender, about 15-20 minutes. Then add yoghurt and the rest of the ingredients, stirring well. Simmer uncovered on low heat for another 15 – 20 minutes.

 

Comments: Good with cucumber raita and lime pickle for vata. Serve over rice or other grain. This easy-to-prepare curry is likely to garner you rave reviews. The cooling qualities of the peas and potatoes are offset by the over vegetables and the curry spices. This small amount of yoghurt, thinned with water, is usually tolerated well by all doshas and aids digestion. Whenever you can, use tender fresh, rather than frozen peas, as they are more balancing for kapha and vata.

TRIDOSHIC VEGETABLE CURRY # 2

Preparation time: 35 minutes                                                            Serves 8 – 10

-Vata, – Pitta, – Kapha

 1 cup of fresh green string beans or asparagus, fresh, chopped

½ cup ripe tomato, chopped in ½ inch cubes (optional, omit for Pitta)

½ cup or carrots, diced’

1 ½ cup of potatoes, cubed in ½ inch pieces

¼ cup baby lima beans (optional)

½ bunch of spinach (or other greens (well washed, chopped

1 – 3 tbsp sunflower oil (the lesser amount for kapha)

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp sea salt

3 cups water

1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp coriander powder

1 hot green pepper, chopped (as garnish for Kapha only)

1 tsp curry powder, mild

Wash, dry and chop vegetables. In a large deep pan heat oil; add cumin and mustard seeds. When the mustard seeds pop, add tomatoes, curry powder and turmeric. Cook 3 to 4 minutes over medium heat, Add remaining ingredients, including water. Mix well. Cook for 20 – 25 minutes over medium heat or until soft. Garnish with fresh chopped coriander leaves if available.

Comment: this goes well with rice, barley, or millet and spinach mushroom salad.

 

FIFTEEN MINUTE VEGETABLE CURRY

Preparation time: 15 minutes                                                            Serves 5 -6

-Vata, – Pitta, 0 Kapha

 

1 cup of raw carrots ( 2 medium carrots)

1 cup of fresh or frozen green peas ( 1 lb)

2 tbsp sunflower oil

1/8 tsp hing

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp whole cumin seeds

½ tsp sea salt

½ – 1 pound of tofu (optional for kapha)

1 tsp curry powder, mild

1 tsp coriander powder

¼ cup water

2 tsp brown rice syrup (use ½ tsp for Kapha)

¼ – 1 cup plain yoghurt (use smaller amount for Pitta and Kapha)

¼ hot green pepper, chopped (optional, omit for Pitta)

 

Heat oil or ghee in large heavy skillet. Add mustard and cumin sees, when the mustard seeds pop, add turmeric. Then add all the vegetables and the water. (If using frozen peas, do not add until rest of vegetables are nearly done.) Cook covered until the vegetables become tender, about 15-20 minutes. Then add yoghurt and the rest of the ingredients, stirring well. Simmer uncovered on low heat for another 15 – 20 minutes.

Comments: Good with cucumber raita and lime pickle for vata. Serve over rice or other grain. This easy-to-prepare curry is likely to garner you rave reviews. The cooling qualities of the peas and potatoes are offset by the over vegetables and the curry spices. This small amount of yoghurt, thinned with water, is usually tolerated well by all doshas and aids digestion. Whenever you can, use tender fresh, rather than frozen peas, as they are more balancing for kapha and vata.

 

SPINACH AND POTATO CURRY

Preparation time: 30 minutes                                                                        Serves 4-6

Mildy + vata, 0 Pitta, – Kapha*

0 vata, – Pitta, 0 Kapha**

 

3 medium potatoes or 6 medium parsnips

1 large bunch of fresh spinach (1/2 pounds)

1 1/2 tbsp sunflower oil

1/8 tsp hing

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp sea salt

2 cups water

½ tsp turmeric

2 tsp coriander powder

2 tbsp lemon juice

¼ green pepper, chopped (optional, omit for Pitta)

2 cloves fresh garlic, minced (optional omit for Pitta)

Wash spinach and potatoes. Cut potatoes into ½ inch cubes; chop spinach. Heat oil in a heavy saucepan or skillet and add mustard seeds and hing. When seeds pop, add turmeric, potatoes and water. Stir. Cover and cook on medium heat for 5 to 7 minutes. Then add spinach and all other ingredients. Mix well. Cook covered for an additional 10 to 15 minutes. Serve

Comments: This goes well with rotalis and Cucumber raita or yoghurt. The bitter and astringent tastes of spinach balance Pitta and Kapha well; the cooling effect of the potato balances the pungent vipak of spinach for Pitta, making these two vegetables an excellent combination.

 

  • * with potato
  • ** with parsnip

 

BUTTERMILK CURRY (KADHI)

Preparation time: 30 minutes                                                            Serves 6 – 8

-vata, mildly + pitta, + kapha*

 

6 medium parsnips

3 medium carrots (1/2 pound)

2 tbsp sunflower oil or ghee

1/8 tsp hing

1 tsp black mustard seeds

½ tsp sea salt

¼   cups water

½ tsp turmeric

¼ – 1 cup plain yoghurt (the lesser amount for Pitta and Kapha)

¼ cup additional water

¼ tsp cinnamon

½ tsp curry powder, mild

1 tsp coriander powder

Shredded unsweetened coconut as garnish

Fresh coriander leaves, chopped, as garnish

Wash vegetables and dice into ½ to 1 inch pieces. Heat oil or ghee in a large skillet; add mustard seeds and hing. When mustard seeds pop, add turmeric, ¼ cup water, parsnips and carrots. Stir well. Cover and cook on medium heat for 15 minutes. Add yogurt, rest of water, and rest of spices. Cook another 5 minutes, covered, over low heat. Garnish with coconut and fresh coriander leaves.

Comments: This goes well with rice, barley, or cracked wheat. This recipe also makes a good vegetable side dish. If you omit the yogurt add additional water.

 

  • Kaphas can take a pinch of dry ginger with this to calm its effect for them

 

OKRA CURRY

Preparation time: 25 to 30 minutes                                                            Serves 5 – 6

-vata, – pitta, + kapha

 

½ pound fresh okra ( 2 cups chopped)

1 ½   tbsp sunflower oil or ghee

1 tsp black mustard seeds

½ tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp sea salt

3 cups water

½ tsp turmeric

2 cups plain yoghurt or buttermilk

3 tbsp rice syrup or barley malt

3 tbsp lime or lemon juice

¼ hot green pepper, chopped (optional)

½ tsp curry powder, mild

 

Wash and dry okra thoroughly. Cut into ½ inch pieces, throw the tops away. Heat oil in large (over 2 quarts) saucepan, add mustard and cumin seeds. When mustard seeds pop, add turmeric and okra. Cover and cook over low heat for 5 minutes. Combine yogurt, water and chickpea flour in a large bowl. Beat until smooth. Add this yogurt mixture to the okra, with remaining ingredients. Boil uncovered over medium heat for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally so that it will not stick.

 

Comment: This goes well with rice, chappati, and a vegetable side dish.

 

TRIDOSHIC DAL

Preparation time: 1 hour                                                                        Serves 6

-vata, – pitta, 0 kapha*

 

1 cup split mung dal

2 cups summer squash, in ¼ to ½ inch slices

1 cup or carrots, in ¼ to ½ inch slices

1/8 tsp hing

2 tbsp sunflower oil or ghee

1 tbsp lime or lemon juice or 1 tbsp amchoor (dried mango powder)

½ tbsp fresh ginger root, minced

1 small hot green pepper, chopped finely or ¼ cup prepared salsa (omit for Pitta, and easy on this for Vata)

1 1/4 tbsp cumin seeds

½ tsp to 1 tbsp black mustard seeds (the smaller amount for pitta, the greater amount for vata and kapha)

1 tsp sea salt

8 cups water

1 ¼ tsp turmeric

Garnish: Fresh coriander leaves, chopped and shredded unsweetened coconut.

 

Wash dal until rinse water is clear. Wash and chop vegetables.

Warm 1 tbsp oil or ghee in large heavy saucepan. Add hing, turmeric, and lemon juice and sauté for 30 seconds over low heat (be careful, it is easy for turmeric to burn). Stir in the beans and sauté for another 1 to 2 minutes. Add the chopped vegetables and stir another minute or two. Add water, salt, ginger and pepper (if you are using it); bring to a boil on high heat. Then cover and reduce heat to medium – low. Let soup simmer for 45 minutes or until beans have dissolved. Warm remaining tbsp of oil or ghee in a small skillet; add cumin and mustard seeds, heat until the mustard seeds begin to pop. Add to soup, which is now ready to serve. Garnish with fresh chopped coriander leaves and coconut.

 

Comment: dals are an easy and popular way in India to get a nourishing protein rich meal. They are good with plain Indian rice and vegetable side dish. This dal originally evolved from one served by the Hari Krishna people in the States.

Dals are always prepared with something sour in the vagar (mixture of spices and ghee) to stimulate digestive fire. In Mumbai, tamarind is often used, while in the Gujarati province, lemon, lime or amchoor add this stimulating sourness. It must be added in the early stages of cooking for best effect.

*Serve with warming condiments such as chopped scallion, fresh green chilli or dry ginger to calm Kapha.

 

GUJARATI TRIDOSHIC DAL

Preparation time: 40 minutes plus 2 hour soak for split mung

1 hour 15 minutes plus 2 hour soak for whole mung                                    Serves 6 -8

-vata, – pitta, – kapha

1 ¾ cups split mung dal or whole mung beans

1 tbsp sunflower oil or ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp sea salt

6 ½   cups water

½ tsp turmeric

1/8 tsp hing

1 tsp coriander powder

1 ½ tsp of barley malt or brown rice syrup

1 ½ tsp lime or lemon juice

½ tsp cinnamon

¼ tsp curry powder, mild

¼ green pepper, chopped (optional for Pitta)

1 clove garlic, minced (optional for Pitta)

 

Soak mung for 2 hours, then drain. In a large heavy sauce pan heat oil or ghee and add mustard seeds. When they pop, add turmeric, hing, mung, water, and remaining ingredients. Mix well. Cover and cook for ½ hour if split mung. 1 hour if whole mung, or until mung is quite soft.

 

Comments: this is good with chappatis, Buttermilk curry, rice and vegetables. Good all-purpose dal from the Gujarati region. The soaking is important to minimise gas. The beans can be soaked overnight if this is more convenient for you. Kapha needs to garnish with peppers and dry ginger for this recipe to be calming.

 

ZUCCHINI AND MUNG DAL

Preparation time: 1 to 1 ½ hours, plus 2 hours to soak                        serves 4 – 5

–       vata, – pitta, – kapha

1 cups split mung dal or whole mung beans

1 1/2 tbsp sunflower oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp sea salt

4 cups water

½ tsp turmeric

1/8 tsp hing

½ – 1 tsp coriander powder

¼ hot green chilli pepper, chopped (optional, omit for pitta)

1 lime juice

¼ hot green chilli pepper, chopped (optional omit for Pitta)

Soak mung in 4 cups water for 2 hours. Heat oil in heavy skillet, add mustard seeds. When they pop, add turmeric, hing, line juice, and drained mung beans. Add fresh ginger root and 4 cups of water. Cover and cook over medium heat for 20 minutes if split mung. 1 hour more if whole mung beans. Add zucchini and remaining ingredients and cook 15 minutes or until beans are soft.

 

Comments: This goes well with rice and rotali. Pitta needs to garnish lavishly with chopped coriander leaves or coriander powder to offset the fresh ginger.

 

AMA- REDUCING DAL

Preparation time: 3 days to sprout mung. 30 minutes to 1 hour to make the soup.

-vata, – pitta, – kapha*                                                                                    Serves 5 – 6

-vata, +pitta, – kapha**

 

2 to 3 cups sprouted mung beans

2 to 3 cups vegetables, chopped (broccoli, carrots, greens, sprouts, green beans or asparagus work well)

1 1/2 tbsp ghee or olive oil

1 to 2 inches of garlic, or fresh ginger root, peeled and chopped finely

1 to 3 cloves crushed (omit if pitta is high)

½ to 1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp coriander seeds

½ to 1 tsp turmeric

½ tsp fresh ground black pepper

2 to 3 bay leaves

1/8 tsp each of fennel seed, hing, cinnamon and cardamom

½ cup fresh coriander leaves chopped

 

Garnish: coconut and more chopped coriander leaves

In a pressure cooker, cook sprouted mung for about two minutes after reaching full pressure, or cook the beans in water in a covered saucepan until soft. Using the cooking water, puree mung in blender. Set aside.

In soup pot, warm ghee or oil. Add spices and toss until coasted and their aromas emerge. Add chopped vegetables to spices and oil and toss until coated. Stir for two minutes, then add 4 to 6 cups of water. Mix well. Bring to boil, then reduce heat and simmer covered until veggies are cooked. Add pureed mung beans to soup pot. Stir. Bring to boil again. Reduce heat and let soup simmer for five minutes. Add more water if a thinner consistency is desired. Add salt to taste, about ½ tsp.

Comments: This recipe is specifically designed to reduce ama and rest the digestive tract during illness, convalescence or rejuvenation therapy. The mung beans are cooling by nature, yet are warmed by the addition of the ginger and the other warming spices. Amounts of the spices and the type of vegetables used can be adjusted to suit the individual. One stick of kombu can be also added to reduce gas and add trace minerals. This is an excellent one-dish mean which can be served a few times each week to rest the system, if you like.

*without garlic

** with garlic

 

MISO TOFU

Preparation time: 15 to 20 minutes                                                            Serves 2 – 3

-vata, – pitta, – kapha

 

1 carton (1 pound) tofu

1 tbsp sunflower oil

½ medium onion, finely sliced (optional)

1/8 tsp black pepper

1 tbsp barley miso or mellow white miso

1 tbsp tamari

¾ cup water

3 dried Shitake mushrooms (optional, tasty)

Put mushrooms in water to soak. Warm oil in heavy skillet and sauté onion until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain tofu and cut into 1 inch cubes. Add it to the onion and stir-sauté 5 minutes, sprinkling black pepper over it. Drain mushrooms, reserving water to be used in next step. Add mushrooms to sautéing tofu. Mix miso and tamari with water, pour over tofu in skillet. Heat another 3 minutes, and then serve.

Comments: Vata needs to garnish with fresh grated ginger root to be balanced. Kapha should garnish with a pinch of dry ginger. The cooking, miso, and tamari warm otherwise ‘cool’ tofu. Salt is kept to a minimum by adding minimal amounts of miso and tamari, yet enough to enhance Agni and make the tofu easier for Vata to digest. Shitake mushrooms add flavour and strengthen the immune system.

 

PORRIDGE                                                                                                             serves 1

½ cup oats (not quick oats)

1 cup of water

Add a good pinch of cinnamon, ginger*, ground cardamom, salt*

* avoid for/reduce for pitta

1 tbsp sultanas for sweetener (avoid for Kapha)

 

Combine all ingredients and cook well for 5 – 10 minutes. Add milk (reduce for kapha) at the end of cooking. Bring back to the boil.

 

RICE AND DAL                                                                                     serves 1 – 2

 

½ cup basmati or other long grain rice

¼ cup mung dal

1 tsp ghee

¼ tsp cumin seeds

1/8 tsp black mustard seeds

1 ½ – 2 cups water

 

Place rice dal and water in a saucepan and bring to the boil slowly. Stir with a fork occasionally. While this is happening heat ghee and add mustard seeds. When mustard seeds begin to pop add cumin seeds and remove from heat after about 20 seconds. Add to the boiling rice and dal and stir through. Reduce heat to very low and cover with a tight fitting lid. Turn off heat after 5 -10 minutes and let stand covered for another 10 minutes. Eat with the steam vegetables.

Comment: this is a light, nutritious evening meal that can be taken with steamed vegetables according to your dosha.

Note: In all recipes use ghee or sunflower or olive oil for cooking (minimal oil for kapha and pitta)

 

 

 

 

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